Category: Evidence

Supporting Struggling Readers at Secondary School

19 June 2018

We have been lucky enough to add a few new books to the Durrington Research School library this term, one of which is James and Dianne Murphy’s Thinking Reading: What Every Secondary Teachers Needs to Know about Reading. In this book, the authors cite research carried out in the US and published in Effective Instruction for Adolescent Struggling Readers. This paper provides some interesting research evidence and ideas for practice, which may or may not suit your context. However, there is plenty of food for thought to support the complex decision making required when it comes to supporting struggling readers in secondary school. […]

Posted on: 19 June 2018
Posted in: Blog, Evidence, Training/CPD

New guidance on preparing for literacy

15 June 2018

The Education Endowment Foundation (EEF) has published its latest guidance report, Preparing for Literacy, which reviews the best available research to offer early years professionals practical “do’s and don’ts” to make sure all children start school with the foundations they need to read and write well. […]

Posted on: 15 June 2018
Posted in: Evidence

What does research evidence tell us about effective questioning?

24 May 2018

By Andy Tharby Asking questions has always has been an essential ingredient of the craft of teaching. For the most effective and successful teachers, it is usually such an ingrained part of classroom dialogue that it seems to happen quite naturally. It can be very hard for new teachers to emulate this kind of seamless, […]

Posted on: 24 May 2018
Posted in: Blog, Evidence
Tagged as: ,

Stealthy psychological interventions

25 April 2018

At this half-term’s Durrington High School journal club we looked at David Yeager, Gregory Walton and Geoffrey L. Cohen’s paper ‘Addressing achievement gaps with psychological interventions’ (2013) that explores the way that carefully planned and delivered ‘psychological interventions’ can be used to boost student outcomes. […]

Author: Andy Tharby
Posted on: 25 April 2018
Posted in: Blog, Evidence
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Using cognitive load theory to improve slideshow presentations

19 April 2018

Written by Andy Tharby In recent years, the slideshow has become so ubiquitous that it has become synonymous with the lesson itself. ‘I just need to finish planning this lesson’ has come to mean ‘I just need to complete slides 56 and 57 of my PowerPoint slideshow.’ However, the jury is still out as to whether […]

Posted on: 19 April 2018
Posted in: Blog, Evidence, Uncategorized
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We Need to Talk About Genetics

5 March 2018

At the recent Research Schools Conference on 7th February, Dr Kathryn Asbury, lecturer in Psychology and Education at the University of York, presented some stimulating findings from her work on the relevance of genetics to education. […]

Author: Fran Haynes
Posted on: 5 March 2018
Posted in: Blog, Evidence
Tagged as: ,

Insights into assessment from ‘What Does This Look Like in the Classroom’

24 January 2018

A must read for any teacher wanting to become more research-informed. With chapters on topics like literacy, behaviour, motivation and technology, the book features a series of interviews with notable education researchers, theorists and practitioners. […]

Posted on: 24 January 2018
Posted in: Blog, Evidence
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Research Bites – Worked Examples

11 January 2018

Put simply, a worked example is a completed (or partly completed) problem that students can see and refer to while they are working on a similar problem. […]

Posted on: 11 January 2018
Posted in: Blog, Evidence, Uncategorized
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EEF Evaluation: Communicating and Engaging with Research

12 December 2017

Recently, the EEF published its findings from two ‘Literacy Octopus’ trials, so called after their multi-armed design. Both trials focused on supporting teaching and learning of literacy at KS2, and evaluated the impact of communicating research to schools […]

Author: Fran Haynes
Posted on: 12 December 2017
Posted in: Blog, Evidence
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Fully Guided Instruction

21 November 2017

In 2006, Paul A. Kirschner, John Sweller and Richard E. Clark wrote a seminal paper on the shortfalls of minimal instructional guidance. They followed this in 2012 with an article for American Educator – ‘Putting Students on the Path to Learning: The Case for Fully Guided Instruction’ – in which they explored the reasons why explicit teaching is usually a more effective approach than minimal guidance. This blog will provide a brief summary of the 2012 article and will explore its implications for day-to-day classroom practice. […]

Author: Andy Tharby
Posted on: 21 November 2017
Posted in: Blog, Evidence
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